KLANGBADHALL

Conceptual fundamentals festival KLANGBADHALL

The Festival KLANGBADHALL is based on the cultural identity of the city of Bad Hall, whose reputation as a spa has its roots in the 1855 initiative of former governor Eduard von Bach to build a bathhouse in ‘Hall’. From Bach’s initiative a spa town evolved, which was called ‘Bad Hall’ in 1876 and which at the same time developed its artistic and musical profile. As a result, a symbiosis between the economic aspect of the resort and the artistic musical culture emerged. These aspects finally collided to produce spoiled spa guests. Guests at the resort not only enjoy treatments, but also attend musical offerings. Thus, taking cures and indulging in arts are inseparable, and Bad Hall has become a model city for the mutual interaction between economy and arts on behalf of citizens and visitors alike.

This historically developed profile provides KLANGBADHALL with a strong cultural base for sound artistic work. The festival programme will comprise both classical and modern music. Classical music is present because of Bad Hall’s 150-year-old operetta tradition. This tradition started when the first Bad Hall theatre was opened in 1870 with Franz von Suppé’s one-act ‘Der flotte Bursch’. Suppé was 51 years old, the same age as Jacques Offenbach, whose work was on show there only two years later.

Hence, on these historic grounds, Bad Hall now offers modern contemporary entertainment theatre. Subsequently, for KLANGBADHALL, a programmatic circle closes with modern forms of music, which will already be present with the introduction of pop and rock music at NACHHALL in 2017. The historically inspired and newly interpreted programmatic framework of the festival will include opera, operetta, musical, and dance events from different periods. Additionally, KLANGBADHALL will host an intercultural forum enhancing international and intercultural dialogue from a scientific, musical and artistic perspective. Thus, the musical catalogue of the festival achieves nationwide relevance.

Ernst Theis